hither yon

hither

[hith-er]
adverb
1.
to or toward this place: to come hither.
adjective
2.
being on this or the closer side; nearer: the hither side of the meadow.
Idioms
3.
hither and thither, in various quarters; here and there: They scurried hither and thither to escape the rain.
4.
hither and yon, from here to over there, especially to a farther place; in or to a great many places: He looked hither and yon for the coin. She went hither and yon in search of an answer.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English, Old English hider; cognate with Old Norse hethra, Latin citer on this side

hence, hither, thence, thither, whence, whither, yon (see usage note at whence).
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World English Dictionary
hither (ˈhɪðə)
 
adv
1.  hitherward, Also (archaic): hitherwards to or towards this place (esp in the phrase come hither)
2.  hither and thither this way and that, as in a state of confusion
 
adj
3.  archaic, dialect or (of a side or part, esp of a hill or valley) nearer; closer
 
[Old English hider; related to Old Norse hethra here, Gothic hidrē, Latin citrā on this side, citrō]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hither
O.E. hider, from P.Gmc. *khideran (cf. O.N. heðra "here," Goth. hidre "hither"), from Gmc. demonstrative base *hi- (cf. he, here). Spelling change from -d- to -th- is the same evolution seen in father (q.v.). Relation to here is the same as that of thither to there.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Synonyms
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