Hol Hamoed

Hol Hamoed

[Sephardic Hebrew khawl hah-maw-ed; Ashkenazic Hebrew khohl-hah-moh-eyd, -moid]
noun Hebrew.
the period between the first and last two days of Passover or Sukkoth, consisting of four days during Passover and five days during Sukkoth and having less than full festival status.


Origin:
ḥōl hammōʿēdh literally, the secular part of the feast

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hol hamoed

in Judaism, the less festive days or semiholidays that occur between the initial and final days of the Passover (Pesah) and Sukkot religious holidays. Because Jews in Israel celebrate Passover for seven days and Sukkot for eight, and Jews outside Israel add an additional day to each festival, the number of hol ha-mo'ed days is regulated by the locale. Israel, moreover, solemnizes only the first and last day of each festival, whereas the first two and last two days of each observance are solemnized by Jews outside Israel. The principal ceremonies (such as the eating of matzot) are observed during hol ha-mo'ed, but some work is not forbidden; marriages are postponed until after the festival, so that the happiness of one occasion may not interfere with that of another.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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