holiday

[hol-i-dey]
noun
1.
a day fixed by law or custom on which ordinary business is suspended in commemoration of some event or in honor of some person.
2.
any day of exemption from work (distinguished from working day ).
3.
a time or period of exemption from any requirement, duty, assessment, etc.: New businesses may be granted a one-year tax holiday.
4.
a religious feast day; holy day, especially any of several usually commemorative holy days observed in Judaism.
5.
Sometimes, holidays. Chiefly British. a period of cessation from work or one of recreation; vacation.
6.
an unintentional gap left on a plated, coated, or painted surface.
adjective
7.
of or pertaining to a festival; festive; joyous: a holiday mood.
8.
suitable for a holiday: holiday attire.
verb (used without object)
9.
Chiefly British. to vacation: to holiday at the seaside.

Origin:
before 950; Middle English; Old English hāligdæg. See holy, day

preholiday, adjective


2. vacation, break.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
holiday (ˈhɒlɪˌdeɪ, -dɪ)
 
n
1.  chiefly (Brit) (often plural)
 a.  US and Canadian word: vacation a period in which a break is taken from work or studies for rest, travel, or recreation
 b.  (as modifier): a holiday mood
2.  a day on which work is suspended by law or custom, such as a religious festival, bank holiday, etcRelated: ferial
 
vb
3.  chiefly (Brit) (intr) to spend a holiday
 
Related: ferial
 
[Old English hāligdæg, literally: holy day]

Holiday (ˈhɒlɪˌdeɪ)
 
n
Billie. real name Eleanora Fagan; known as Lady Day. 1915--59, US jazz singer

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

holiday
O.E. haligdæg, from halig "holy" + dæg "day;" in 14c. meaning both "religious festival" and "day of recreation," but pronunciation and sense diverged 16c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
At one time a district of public gardens much frequented on holidays.
As the holidays approach, so do tasty treats laden with calories, many of them
  provided by fat.
Combine these two setbacks with the holidays and two blizzards, and the result
  has been slow progress.
They took over the churches, holidays and such and replaced them with ideas and
  events that replaced those traditions.
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