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homesick

[hohm-sik] /ˈhoʊmˌsɪk/
adjective
1.
sad or depressed from a longing for home or family while away from them for a long time.
Origin of homesick
1790-1800
1790-1800; home + sick1
Related forms
homesickness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for homesickness
Historical Examples
  • I guess it was the homesickness, after all, that made me blue.

    Deerfoot in The Mountains Edward S. Ellis
  • She'd die of homesickness, and I know she'll never consent to leave me.

    The Little Colonel Annie Fellows Johnston
  • Northwick gave a gasp in the anguish of homesickness the words brought upon him.

    The Quality of Mercy W. D. Howells
  • “When our lords have once been seized with homesickness, then we may hold them no longer,” said they.

  • I only wish I too by any amount of weeping and homesickness could earn as much.

    Louisa May Alcott Louisa May Alcott
  • I surrendered to the wave of homesickness that swept over me.

    Ruggles of Red Gap Harry Leon Wilson
  • When the waves of regret and homesickness come I cheer myself with thoughts of Italy.

    The Guests Of Hercules C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson
  • Gorman too, in his own way, suffered from homesickness and had fits of irritation.

    The Island Mystery George A. Birmingham
  • The sight of Porter and the mention of Clarkson brought his homesickness to an acute stage.

    The Main Chance Meredith Nicholson
  • It was not extravagance, but homesickness, that tormented him.

British Dictionary definitions for homesickness

homesick

/ˈhəʊmˌsɪk/
adjective
1.
depressed or melancholy at being away from home and family
Derived Forms
homesickness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for homesickness
n.

1756, translating German heimweh, from Heim "home" + Weh "woe, pain;" the compound is from Swiss dialect, expressing the longing for the mountains. The word was introduced to other European languages 17c. by Swiss mercenaries.

homesick

adj.

1798, back-formation from homesickness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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