hooting

hoot

1 [hoot]
verb (used without object)
1.
to cry out or shout, especially in disapproval or derision.
2.
to utter the cry characteristic of an owl.
3.
to utter a similar sound.
4.
Chiefly British. to blow a horn or whistle; toot.
verb (used with object)
5.
to assail with shouts of disapproval or derision: The fans hooted the umpire.
6.
to drive out, off, or away by hooting.
7.
to express in hoots: The crowd hooted its disagreement with the speaker.
noun
8.
the cry of an owl.
9.
any similar sound, as an inarticulate shout.
10.
a cry or shout, especially of disapproval or derision.
11.
British. a horn, siren, or whistle, especially a factory whistle.
12.
Informal. the least bit of concern, interest, or thought; trifle: I don't give a hoot.
13.
Slang. an extremely funny person, situation, or event: Your mother's a hoot when she tells about her escapades in boarding school.

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English hoten, huten, houten (v.); perhaps imitative

hootingly, adverb
unhooted, adjective


1, 5. jeer, boo, hiss. 5. razz.
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World English Dictionary
hoot1 (huːt)
 
n
1.  the mournful wavering cry of some owls
2.  a similar sound, such as that of a train whistle
3.  a jeer of derision
4.  informal an amusing person or thing: the weekend was a hoot
5.  not give a hoot not to care at all
 
vb
6.  (often foll by at) to jeer or yell (something) contemptuously (at someone)
7.  (tr) to drive (political speakers, actors on stage, etc) off or away by hooting
8.  (intr) to make a hoot
9.  (Brit) (intr) to blow a horn
 
[C13 hoten, of imitative origin]

hoot or hoots2 (huːt, huːts)
 
interj
an exclamation of impatience or dissatisfaction: a supposed Scotticism
 
[C17: of unknown origin]
 
hoots or hoots2
 
interj
 
[C17: of unknown origin]

hoot3 (huːt)
 
n
(Austral), (NZ) a slang word for money
 
[from Māori utu price]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hoot
c.1200, "to call or shout in disapproval or scorn," related to houten, huten "to shout, call out" (early 13c.), probably imitative. First used of bird cries, especially that of the owl, mid-15c. The noun meaning "a laugh, something funny" is first recorded 1942. Slang sense of "smallest amount or particle"
(esp. in don't give a hoot) is from 1878.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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