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horrendous

[haw-ren-duh s, ho-] /hɔˈrɛn dəs, hɒ-/
adjective
1.
shockingly dreadful; horrible:
a horrendous crime.
Origin
1650-1660
1650-60; < Latin horrendus dreadful, to be feared (gerund of horrēre to bristle, shudder), equivalent to horr- (akin to hirsute) + -endus gerund suffix
Related forms
horrendously, adverb
Synonyms
appalling, frightful, hideous.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for horrendously
  • Fifteen comments before me, and almost all of them horrendously long.
  • It is horrendously unreliable, and is the number one cause of wrongful convictions in criminal cases.
  • Let's face it, space hardware is horrendously expensive.
  • Children are being made to suffer horrendously for no reason.
  • The relationships between people become horrendously complex.
  • When you listen to the tapes, it couldn't feel more horrendously true.
  • Regulatory oversight is often ponderously slow, and our airport security apparatus is horrendously wasteful.
  • Their shares are either reasonably valued or horrendously expensive, depending on your view of the boom's sustainability.
  • But unless something dramatic happens in the next month the experts will again have been horrendously wrong and few people notice.
  • It sits at the apex of a horrendously hierarchical and unequal society.
British Dictionary definitions for horrendously

horrendous

/hɒˈrɛndəs/
adjective
1.
another word for horrific
Derived Forms
horrendously, adverb
Word Origin
C17: from Latin horrendus fearful, from horrēre to bristle, shudder, tremble; see horror
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for horrendously

horrendous

adj.

1650s, from Latin horrendus "dreadful, fearful, terrible," literally "to be shuddered at," gerundive of horrere "to bristle with fear, shudder" (see horror). Earlier form in English was horrend (mid-15c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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