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howl

[houl] /haʊl/
verb (used without object)
1.
to utter a loud, prolonged, mournful cry, as that of a dog or wolf.
2.
to utter a similar cry in distress, pain, rage, etc.; wail.
3.
to make a sound like an animal howling:
The wind howls through the trees.
4.
Informal. to go on a spree; enjoy oneself without restraint.
verb (used with object)
5.
to utter with howls:
to howl the bad news.
6.
to drive or force by howls (often followed by down):
to howl down the opposition.
noun
7.
the cry of a dog, wolf, etc.
8.
a cry or wail, as of pain, rage, or protest.
9.
a sound like wailing:
the howl of the wind.
10.
a loud, scornful laugh or yell.
11.
something that causes a laugh or a scornful yell, as a joke or funny or embarrassing situation.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English hulen, houlen (v.); cognate with Dutch huilen, Low German hülen, German heulen, Danish hyle; akin to Old Norse ȳla
Related forms
outhowl, verb (used with object)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for howled
  • They sat around it smoking and talking, looking at the stars, wishing for home as wild dogs or jackals howled in the desert.
  • As the thunder howled around us and lightning flashed, rain mixed with tears streaming down my face.
  • Still, many environmentalists howled at the choice of sticker design.
  • Same goes for the howler monkeys, who howled too late.
  • It's a movie for anyone who has ever plugged in an electric guitar and howled into a microphone, or has ever dreamed of doing so.
  • Blood calls to blood, calls to the wound, the singer howled.
  • During the first set everyone clapped on cue and howled.
  • Case emerged a few feet away from him and howled, the sound echoing around the walls of the quarry.
  • Suddenly the puma howled again, this time more painfully.
  • The crowd bayed and howled at each new monstrous image.
British Dictionary definitions for howled

howl

/haʊl/
noun
1.
a long plaintive cry or wail characteristic of a wolf or hound
2.
a similar cry of pain or sorrow
3.
(slang)
  1. a person or thing that is very funny
  2. a prolonged outburst of laughter
4.
(electronics) an unwanted prolonged high-pitched sound produced by a sound-producing system as a result of feedback
verb
5.
to express in a howl or utter such cries
6.
(intransitive) (of the wind, etc) to make a wailing noise
7.
(intransitive) (informal) to shout or laugh
Word Origin
C14: houlen; related to Middle High German hiuweln, Middle Dutch hūlen, Danish hyle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for howled

howl

v.

early 13c., houlen, probably ultimately of imitative origin; similar formations are found in other Germanic languages. Related: Howled; howling. As a noun from 1590s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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