hutted

hut

[huht]
noun
1.
a small or humble dwelling of simple construction, especially one made of natural materials, as of logs or grass.
2.
a simple roofed shelter, often with one or two sides left open.
3.
Military. a wooden or metal structure for the temporary housing of troops.
verb (used with object), hutted, hutting.
4.
to furnish with a hut as temporary housing; billet.
verb (used without object), hutted, hutting.
5.
to lodge or take a shelter in a hut.

Origin:
1645–55; < French hutte < Frankish, cognate with Old Saxon hutta, Old High German hutt(e)a < West Germanic *hudjā; akin to hide1

hutlike, adjective


1. shed, hovel.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
hut (hʌt)
 
n
1.  a small house or shelter, usually made of wood or metal
2.  (Austral) the hut (on a sheep or cattle station) accommodation for the shearers, stockmen, etc
3.  (NZ) a shelter for mountaineers, skiers, etc
 
vb
4.  to furnish with or live in a hut
 
[C17: from French hutte, of Germanic origin; related to Old High German hutta a crude dwelling]
 
'hutlike
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hut
1658, from Fr. hutte "cottage" (16c.), from M.H.G. hütte "cottage, hut," probably from P.Gmc. *khudjan-, from the root of O.E. hydan "to hide." Apparently first in Eng. as a military word.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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