hydrometeorology

hydrometeorology

[hahy-druh-mee-tee-uh-rol-uh-jee]
noun
the study of atmospheric water, especially precipitation, as it affects agriculture, water supply, flood control, power generation, etc.

Origin:
1860–65; hydro-1 + meteorology

hydrometeorologist, noun
hydrometeorological [hahy-druh-mee-tee-er-uh-loj-i-kuhl] , adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To hydrometeorology
Collins
World English Dictionary
hydrometeor (ˌhaɪdrəʊˈmiːtɪə)
 
n
any weather condition produced by water or water vapour in the atmosphere, such as rain, snow, or cloud
 
hydrometeoro'logical
 
adj
 
hydrometeor'ology
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Science Dictionary
hydrometeorology   (hī'drō-mē'tē-ə-rŏl'ə-jē)  Pronunciation Key 
The scientific study of the interaction between meteorological and hydrologic phenomena, including the occurrence, motion, and changes of state of atmospheric water, and the land surface and subsurface phases of the hydrologic cycle. Hydrometeorologic studies address questions regarding land use, the long-term effects of climate change on water resources, and regional precipitation.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

hydrometeorology

branch of meteorology that deals with problems involving the hydrologic cycle, the water budget, and the rainfall statistics of storms. The boundaries of hydrometeorology are not clear-cut, and the problems of the hydrometeorologist overlap with those of the climatologist, the hydrologist, the cloud physicist, and the weather forecaster. Considerable emphasis is placed on determining, theoretically or empirically, the relationships between meteorological variables and the maximum precipitation reaching the ground. These analyses often serve as the bases for the design of flood-control and water-usage structures, primarily dams and reservoirs. Other concerns of hydrometeorologists include the determination of rainfall probabilities, the space and time distribution of rainfall and evaporation, the recurrence interval of major storms, snow melt and runoff, and probable wind tides and waves in reservoirs. The whole field of water quality and supply is of growing importance in hydrometeorology.

Learn more about hydrometeorology with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature