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hymn

[him] /hɪm/
noun
1.
a song or ode in praise or honor of God, a deity, a nation, etc.
2.
something resembling this, as a speech, essay, or book in praise of someone or something.
verb (used with object)
3.
to praise or celebrate in a hymn; express in a hymn.
verb (used without object)
4.
to sing hymns.
Origin
1000
before 1000; < Latin hymnus < Greek hýmnos song in praise of gods or heroes; replacing Middle English ymne (< Old French) and Old English ymn (< Late Latin ymnus)
Related forms
hymner
[him-er, -ner] /ˈhɪm ər, -nər/ (Show IPA),
noun
hymnlike, adjective
unhymned, adjective
Can be confused
him, hymn.
Synonyms
1. anthem, psalm, paean.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for hymns
  • His poems were not only memorized but set to music as hymns.
  • Soon the seminarians were clapping in rhythm, rocking back and forth to old hymns that had taken on new life.
  • Thousands lined the streets to wave farewell and sing the old anthems and hymns.
  • They would often offer advice, spiritual guidance-even sing hymns.
  • Computers project the words of the hymns onto huge screens, and the temperature is perfectly controlled.
  • Although there was organ music, no hymns were sung, and no one else spoke.
  • As the prayers and hymns flow one after the other, they become antsy.
  • We have several sacred hymns of his, instructions for catechumens, and other pious works.
  • Along with buying recordings of worship songs and hymns, users can create and download sheet music for church bands and choirs.
  • Staples transformed the soundtrack of her past into an extended meditation, a series of hymns to perseverance.
British Dictionary definitions for hymns

hymn

/hɪm/
noun
1.
a Christian song of praise sung to God or a saint
2.
a similar song praising other gods, a nation, etc
verb
3.
to express (praises, thanks, etc) by singing hymns
Derived Forms
hymnic (ˈhɪmnɪk) adjective
hymnlike, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Latin hymnus, from Greek humnos
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hymns
hymn
c.1000, from O.Fr. ymne and O.E. ymen, both from L. hymnus "song of praise," from Gk. hymnos "song or ode in praise of gods or heroes," used in Septuagint for various Heb. words meaning "song praising God." Possibly a var. of hymenaios "wedding song," from Hymen, Gk. god of marriage (see hymen). Evidence for the silent -n- dates from at least 1530.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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hymns in the Bible

occurs only Eph. 5:19 and Col. 3:16. The verb to "sing an hymn" occurs Matt. 26:30 and Mark 14:26. The same Greek word is rendered to "sing praises" Acts 16:25 (R.V., "sing hymns") and Heb. 2:12. The "hymn" which our Lord sang with his disciples at the last Supper is generally supposed to have been the latter part of the Hallel, comprehending Ps. 113-118. It was thus a name given to a number of psalms taken together and forming a devotional exercise. The noun hymn is used only with reference to the services of the Greeks, and was distinguished from the psalm. The Greek tunes required Greek hymns. Our information regarding the hymnology of the early Christians is very limited.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Word Value for hymns

13
13
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