immutable

[ih-myoo-tuh-buhl]
adjective
not mutable; unchangeable; changeless.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin immūtābilis. See im-2, mutable

immutability, immutableness, noun
immutably, adverb
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World English Dictionary
immutable (ɪˈmjuːtəbəl)
 
adj
unchanging through time; unalterable; ageless: immutable laws
 
immuta'bility
 
n
 
im'mutableness
 
n
 
im'mutably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

immutable
1412, from O.Fr. immutable, from L. immutabilis "unchangeable," from in- "not" + mutabilis "changeable," from mutare "to change" (see mutable).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Scientists once believed that long-term memories were immutable.
Physics is an exacting science, bound by immutable laws that are true
  throughout our universe.
The outer sphere of fixed stars was retained and held to be immutable.
More and more of life dripped down beneath him, reduced by the immutable laws
  and relaxed habits of the animal kingdom.
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