imp

[imp]
noun
1.
a little devil or demon; an evil spirit.
2.
a mischievous child.
3.
Archaic. a scion or offshoot of a plant or tree.
4.
Archaic. an offspring.
verb (used with object)
5.
Falconry.
a.
to graft (feathers) into a wing.
b.
to furnish (a wing, tail, etc.) with feathers, as to make good losses or deficiencies and improve powers of flight.
6.
Archaic. to add a piece to; mend or repair.

Origin:
before 900; (noun) Middle English impe, Old English impa, impe shoot, graft < Late Latin impotus, imputus grafted shoot < Greek émphytos planted, implanted, verbal adjective of emphŷein to implant (em- em-2 + phŷein to bring forth); (v.) Middle English impen to plant, graft, Old English impian, geimpian, derivative of the noun (compare Old High German impfōn, impitōn > German impfen to inoculate); sense “demon” < phrase imp of the devil


2. scamp, rascal, brat, devil.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
imp (ɪmp)
 
n
1.  a small demon or devil; mischievous sprite
2.  a mischievous child
 
vb
3.  (tr) falconry to insert (new feathers) into the stumps of broken feathers in order to repair the wing of a hawk or falcon
 
[Old English impa bud, graft, hence offspring, child, from impian to graft, ultimately from Greek emphutos implanted, from emphuein to implant, from phuein to plant]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

imp
O.E. impe, impa "young shoot, graft," from impian "to graft," probably an early W.Gmc. borrowing from V.L. *imptus, from L.L. impotus "implanted," from Gk. emphytos, verbal adj. formed from emphyein "implant," from em- "in" + phyein "to plant." Sense of "child, offspring" (late 14c.) came from transfer
of word from plants to people, with notion of "newness" preserved. Modern meaning "little devil" (1580s) is from common use in pejorative phrases like imp of Satan.
"Suche appereth as aungelles, but in very dede they be ymps of serpentes." ["The Pilgrimage of Perfection," 1526]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
imp
impression
IMP
instrument mounting platform
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Within the access lane there shall be no obstructions of any kind that would imped the movement of the fire vehicles.
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