imperative

[im-per-uh-tiv]
adjective
1.
absolutely necessary or required; unavoidable: It is imperative that we leave.
2.
of the nature of or expressing a command; commanding.
3.
Grammar. noting or pertaining to the mood of the verb used in commands, requests, etc., as in Listen! Go! Compare indicative ( def 2 ), subjunctive ( def 1 ).
noun
4.
a command.
5.
something that demands attention or action; an unavoidable obligation or requirement; necessity: It is an imperative that we help defend friendly nations.
6.
Grammar.
a.
the imperative mood.
b.
a verb in this mood.
7.
an obligatory statement, principle, or the like.

Origin:
1520–30; < Late Latin imperātivus, equivalent to Latin imperāt(us) past participle of imperāre to impose, order, command (im- im-1 + -per- (combining form of parāre to fur-nish (with), produce, obtain, prepare) + -ātus -ate1) + -īvus -ive

imperatively, adverb
imperativeness, noun
nonimperative, adjective
nonimperatively, adverb
nonimperativeness, noun
unimperative, adjective
unimperatively, adverb

imperative, imperial, imperious.


1. inescapable; indispensable, essential; exigent, compelling.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
imperative (ɪmˈpɛrətɪv)
 
adj
1.  extremely urgent or important; essential
2.  peremptory or authoritative: an imperative tone of voice
3.  grammar Also: imperatival denoting a mood of verbs used in giving orders, making requests, etc. In English the verb root without any inflections is the usual form, as for example leave in Leave me alone
 
n
4.  something that is urgent or essential
5.  an order or command
6.  grammar
 a.  the imperative mood
 b.  a verb in this mood
 
[C16: from Late Latin imperātīvus, from Latin imperāre to command]
 
im'peratively
 
adv
 
im'perativeness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

imperative
1530, from L.L. imperativus "pertaining to a command," from imperatus "commanded," pp. of imperare "to command, to requisition," from in- "in" + parare "beget, bear" (see pare).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

imperative definition


A grammatical category describing verbs that command or request: “Leave town by tonight”; “Please hand me the spoon.”

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

imperative definition


imperative language

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
But the imperative to stop global warming-the biggest reason for the
  backlash-reaches only so far.
The access people give to their lives is precious as well as imperative for
  this important work to get done.
Runnels of spindrift avalanches began to pour down the face around us, and it
  became imperative to seek some kind of shelter.
It is imperative for an adopter of a puppy mill dog to exercise patience and
  understanding.
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