impracticable

[im-prak-ti-kuh-buhl]
adjective
1.
not practicable; incapable of being put into practice with the available means: an impracticable plan.
2.
unsuitable for practical use or purposes, as a device or material.
3.
(of ground, places, etc.) impassable.
4.
(of persons) hard to deal with because of stubbornness, stupidity, etc.

Origin:
1645–55; im-2 + practicable

impracticability, impracticableness, noun
impracticably, adverb

impossible, impracticable, impractical, improbable.
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World English Dictionary
impracticable (ɪmˈpræktɪkəbəl)
 
adj
1.  incapable of being put into practice or accomplished; not feasible
2.  unsuitable for a desired use; unfit
3.  an archaic word for intractable
 
impractica'bility
 
n
 
im'practicableness
 
n
 
im'practicably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

impracticable
1677, from in- "not" + practicable. "Incapable of being done." Impractical, in the same sense, dates from 1865.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The rugged character of the country makes logging of any but timber in bottoms
  impracticable.
In the light of day, it was thought to be impracticable.
If this turns out to be politically impracticable, they would allow individuals
  to deduct their medical costs from taxes.
Over rocks and cliffs, through mountain gorges that seemed impracticable, he
  fled and they followed.
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