Impregnably

impregnable

1 [im-preg-nuh-buhl]
adjective
1.
strong enough to resist or withstand attack; not to be taken by force, unconquerable: an impregnable fort.
2.
not to be overcome or overthrown: an impregnable argument.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English impregnable, imprenable < Middle French, equivalent to im- im-2 + prenable pregnable

impregnability, impregnableness, noun
impregnably, adverb


1. invulnerable. 1, 2. See invincible. 2. unassailable.


1. vulnerable.
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World English Dictionary
impregnable1 (ɪmˈprɛɡnəbəl)
 
adj
1.  unable to be broken into or taken by force: an impregnable castle
2.  unable to be shaken or overcome: impregnable self-confidence
3.  incapable of being refuted: an impregnable argument
 
[C15 imprenable, from Old French, from im- (not) + prenable able to be taken, from prendre to take]
 
impregna'bility1
 
n
 
im'pregnableness1
 
n
 
im'pregnably1
 
adv

impregnable or impregnatable2 (ɪmˈprɛɡnəbəl, ˌɪmprɛɡˈneɪtəbəl)
 
adj
able to be impregnated; fertile
 
impregnatable or impregnatable2
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

impregnable
1430, imprenable, from M.Fr. imprenable, from O.Fr. in- "not" + prenable "assailable, vulnerable," from stem of prendre "to take, grasp," from L. prehendere (see prehensile). With intrusive -g- 16c., on model of deign, reign, etc.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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