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imputed

[im-pyoo-tid] /ɪmˈpyu tɪd/
adjective
1.
estimated to have a certain cash value, although no money has been received or credited.
Origin
1905-1910
1905-10; impute + -ed2
Related forms
unimputed, adjective

impute

[im-pyoot] /ɪmˈpyut/
verb (used with object), imputed, imputing.
1.
to attribute or ascribe:
The children imputed magical powers to the old woman.
2.
to attribute or ascribe (something discreditable), as to a person.
3.
Law. to ascribe to or charge (a person) with an act or quality because of the conduct of another over whom one has control or for whose acts or conduct one is responsible.
4.
Theology. to attribute (righteousness, guilt, etc.) to a person or persons vicariously; ascribe as derived from another.
5.
Obsolete. to charge (a person) with fault.
Origin
1325-75; Middle English imputen < Latin imputāre, equivalent to im- im-1 + putāre to assess, reckon, think; see putative
Related forms
imputable, adjective
imputative
[im-pyoo-tuh-tiv] /ɪmˈpyu tə tɪv/ (Show IPA),
adjective
imputatively, adverb
imputativeness, noun
imputedly, adverb
imputer, noun
nonimputable, adjective
nonimputableness, noun
nonimputably, adverb
nonimputative, adjective
nonimputatively, adverb
nonimputativeness, noun
unimputable, adjective
Can be confused
impugn, impute.
Synonyms
1. See attribute.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for imputed
  • The stricter the parents' sense of responsibility, the purer the imputed innocence.
  • He uses an index of average house prices and the imputed rent paid by owner-occupiers that goes into the consumer-price index.
  • Many of the comments seem to condemn the imputed greed of the wealthy.
  • But no racist or imperialist motives can be imputed there.
  • We need to reconstruct that core on the basis of outcomes, not imputed inputs.
  • Sinophiles may rue the villainy imputed to them in movies, but they should realize that villains are often the best parts.
  • The one fault commonly imputed to it is that it has too grave a motive for a comedy of manners.
  • The people were amazed, but imputed their preservation to art-magic, and the martyrs were condemned to be beheaded.
  • But many seeming faults are to be imputed rather to the nature of the undertaking, than the negligence of the performer.
  • Nor is it the poetical faculty itself, or any misapplication of it, to which this want of harmony is to be imputed.
British Dictionary definitions for imputed

impute

/ɪmˈpjuːt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to attribute or ascribe (something dishonest or dishonourable, esp a criminal offence) to a person
2.
to attribute to a source or cause: I impute your success to nepotism
3.
(commerce) to give (a notional value) to goods or services when the real value is unknown
Derived Forms
imputation, noun
imputative, adjective
imputer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Latin imputāre, from im- + putāre to think, calculate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for imputed

impute

v.

early 15c., from Old French imputer (14c.) and directly from Latin imputare "to reckon, make account of, charge, ascribe," from assimilated form of in- "in, into" (see in- (2)) + putare "reckon, clear up, trim, prune, settle" (see pave). Related: Imputed; imputing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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