despite

[dih-spahyt]
preposition
1.
in spite of; notwithstanding.
noun
2.
contemptuous treatment; insult.
3.
malice, hatred, or spite.
verb (used with object), despited, despiting.
4.
Obsolete. to anger or annoy (someone) out of spite.
Idioms
5.
in despite of, in spite of; notwithstanding: He was tolerant in despite of his background and education.

Origin:
1250–1300; orig. in despite of; Middle English despit < Old French < Latin dēspectus view from a height, scorn, equivalent to dēspec-, variant stem of dēspicere (see despicable) + -tus suffix of v. action


1. See notwithstanding.
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World English Dictionary
despite (dɪˈspaɪt)
 
prep
1.  in spite of; undeterred by
 
n
2.  archaic contempt; insult
3.  rare (preposition) in despite of in spite of
 
vb
4.  (tr) an archaic word for spite
 
[C13: from Old French despit, from Latin dēspectus contempt; see despise]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

despite
c.1300, from O.Fr. despit, from L. despectus "a looking down on," from despicere (see despise). The preposition (1593) is short for in despite of (1292), a loan-translation of Fr. en despit de "in contempt of." Almost became despight during 16c. spelling reform.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
And this increase has been in despite of repeated epidemics, and great losses of life due to floods and earthquakes.
In the present case, and in despite of multiple post-service.
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