in tangibly

intangible

[in-tan-juh-buhl]
adjective
1.
not tangible; incapable of being perceived by the sense of touch, as incorporeal or immaterial things; impalpable.
2.
not definite or clear to the mind: intangible arguments.
3.
(of an asset) existing only in connection with something else, as the goodwill of a business.
noun
4.
something intangible, especially an intangible asset: Intangibles are hard to value.

Origin:
1630–40; < Medieval Latin intangibilis. See in-3, tangible

intangibility, intangibleness, noun
intangibly, adverb


2. vague, elusive, fleeting.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
intangible (ɪnˈtændʒɪbəl)
 
adj
1.  incapable of being perceived by touch; impalpable
2.  imprecise or unclear to the mind: intangible ideas
3.  (of property or a business asset) saleable though not possessing intrinsic productive value
 
n
4.  something that is intangible
 
intangi'bility
 
n
 
in'tangibleness
 
n
 
in'tangibly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

intangible
1640, "incapable of being touched," from Fr. intangible (1508), from M.L. intangibilis, from in- "not" + L.L. tangibilis "that may be touched," from L. tangere "to touch" (see tangent). Fig. sense of "that cannot be grasped by the mind" is from 1880. Noun meaning "anything intangible" is from 1914.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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