in tensity of illumination

illumination

[ih-loo-muh-ney-shuhn]
noun
1.
an act or instance of illuminating.
2.
the fact or condition of being illuminated.
3.
a decoration of lights, usually colored lights.
4.
Sometimes, illuminations. an entertainment, display, or celebration using lights as a major feature or decoration.
5.
intellectual or spiritual enlightenment.
6.
Also called illuminance, intensity of illumination. Optics. the intensity of light falling at a given place on a lighted surface; the luminous flux incident per unit area, expressed in lumens per unit of area.
7.
a supply of light: a source of illumination.
8.
decoration of a manuscript or book with a painted design in color, gold, etc.
9.
a design used in such decoration.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Medieval Latin illūminātiōn- (stem of illūminātiō) spiritual enlightenment (Latin: illustriousness, glory) See illuminate, -ion

illuminational, adjective
nonillumination, noun
preillumination, noun
reillumination, noun


5. knowledge, revelation, insight, wisdom.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
illumination (ɪˌluːmɪˈneɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of illuminating or the state of being illuminated
2.  a source of light
3.  chiefly (Brit) (often plural) a light or lights, esp coloured lights, used as decoration in streets, parks, etc
4.  spiritual or intellectual enlightenment; insight or understanding
5.  the act of making understood; clarification
6.  decoration in colours, gold, or silver used on some manuscripts or printed works
7.  physics another name (not in technical usage) for illuminance
 
illumi'national
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

illumination
mid-14c., "spiritual enlightenment," from O.Fr. illumination, from L. illuminationem (nom. illuminatio), from illuminare "to throw into light," from in- "in" (with assimilation of -n- to the following consonant) + lumen (gen. luminis) "light." Meaning "the action of lighting" is from 1560s. Illuminate
(M.E. enlumyen) originally meant "decorate written material with gold, silver, bright colors;" sense of "shining light on" first recorded 1560s. (Illumine in this sense is from late 14c.)
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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