in wake of

wake

2 [weyk]
noun
1.
the track of waves left by a ship or other object moving through the water: The wake of the boat glowed in the darkness.
2.
the path or course of anything that has passed or preceded: The tornado left ruin in its wake.
Idioms
3.
in the wake of,
a.
as a result of: An investigation followed in the wake of the scandal.
b.
succeeding; following: in the wake of the pioneers.

Origin:
1540–50; < Middle Low German, Dutch wake, or Old Norse vǫk hole in the ice

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
wake1 (weɪk)
 
vb , wakes, waking, woke, woken
1.  (often foll by up) to rouse or become roused from sleep
2.  (often foll by up) to rouse or become roused from inactivity
3.  (intr; often foll by to or up to) to become conscious or aware: at last he woke to the situation
4.  (intr) to be or remain awake
5.  (tr) to arouse (feelings etc)
6.  dialect to hold a wake over (a corpse)
7.  archaic, dialect or to keep watch over
8.  informal wake up and smell the coffee to face up to reality, especially in an unpleasant situation
 
n
9.  a watch or vigil held over the body of a dead person during the night before burial
10.  (in Ireland) festivities held after a funeral
11.  the patronal or dedication festival of English parish churches
12.  a solemn or ceremonial vigil
13.  (usually plural) an annual holiday in any of various towns in northern England, when the local factory or factories close, usually for a week or two weeks
14.  rare the state of being awake
 
[Old English wacian; related to Old Frisian wakia, Old High German wahtēn]
 
usage  Where there is an object and the sense is the literal one wake (up) and waken are the commonest forms: I wakened him; I woke him (up). Both verbs are also commonly used without an object: I woke up. Awake and awaken are preferred to other forms of wake where the sense is a figurative one: he awoke to the danger
 
'waker1
 
n

wake2 (weɪk)
 
n
1.  the waves or track left by a vessel or other object moving through water
2.  the track or path left by anything that has passed: wrecked houses in the wake of the hurricane
 
[C16: of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse vaka, vök hole cut in ice, Swedish vak, Danish vaage; perhaps related to Old Norse vökr, Middle Dutch wak wet]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wake
"to become awake," O.E. wacan "to become awake," also from wacian "to be or remain awake," both from P.Gmc. *waken (cf. O.S. wakon, O.N. vaka, Dan. vaage, O.Fris. waka, Du. waken, O.H.G. wahhen, Ger. wachen "to be awake," Goth. wakan "to watch"), from PIE base *weg- "to be strong, be lively" (cf. Skt.
vajah "force, swiftness, race, prize," vajayati "drives on;" L. vegere, vigere "to be live, be active, quicken," vigil "awake, wakeful," vigor "liveliness, activity"). Causative sense "to rouse from sleep" is attested from c.1300. Phrase wake-up call is attested from 1976, originally a call one received from the hotel desk in the morning.

wake
"track left by a moving ship," 1547, perhaps from M.L.G. or M.Du. wake "hole in the ice," from O.N. vok, vaka "hole in the ice," from P.Gmc. *wakwo. The sense perhaps evolved via "track made by a vessel through ice." Perhaps the Eng. word is directly from Scand. Fig. phrase in the wake of "following
close behind" is recorded from 1806.

wake
"state of wakefulness," O.E. -wacu (as in nihtwacu "night watch"), related to watch; and partly from O.N. vaka "vigil, eve before a feast," related to vaka "be awake" (cf. O.H.G. wahta "watch, vigil," M.Du. wachten "to watch, guard;" see wake (v.)).
Meaning "a sitting up at night with a corpse" is attested from early 15c. (the verb in this sense is recorded from mid-13c.). The custom largely survived as an Irish activity. Wakeman (c.1200), which survives as a surname, was M.E. for "watchman."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

wake definition


A funeral celebration, common in Ireland, at which the participants stay awake all night keeping watch over the body of the dead person before burial. A wake traditionally involves a good deal of feasting and drinking.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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