in-constancy

inconstant

[in-kon-stuhnt]
adjective
not constant; changeable; fickle; variable: an inconstant friend.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English inconstaunt < Latin inconstant- (stem of inconstāns) changeable. See in-3, constant

inconstancy, noun
inconstantly, adverb


moody, capricious, vacillating, wavering; undependable, unstable, unsettled, uncertain; mutable, mercurial, volatile. See fickle.


steady.
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World English Dictionary
inconstant (ɪnˈkɒnstənt)
 
adj
1.  not constant; variable
2.  fickle
 
in'constancy
 
n
 
in'constantly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inconstant
1402, "fickle, not steadfast," from M.Fr. inconstant, from L. inconstantem, from in- "not" + constantem (see constant).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

inconstant in·con·stant (ĭn-kŏn'stənt)
adj.

  1. Changing or varying, especially often and without discernible pattern or reason.

  2. Relating to a structure that normally may or may not be present.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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