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incorporate1

[v. in-kawr-puh-reyt; adj. in-kawr-per-it, -prit] /v. ɪnˈkɔr pəˌreɪt; adj. ɪnˈkɔr pər ɪt, -prɪt/
verb (used with object), incorporated, incorporating.
1.
to form into a legal corporation.
2.
to put or introduce into a body or mass as an integral part or parts:
to incorporate revisions into a text.
3.
to take in or include as a part or parts, as the body or a mass does:
His book incorporates his earlier essay.
4.
to form or combine into one body or uniform substance, as ingredients.
5.
to embody:
His book incorporates all his thinking on the subject.
6.
to form into a society or organization.
verb (used without object), incorporated, incorporating.
7.
to form a legal corporation.
8.
to unite or combine so as to form one body.
adjective
9.
legally incorporated, as a company.
10.
combined into one body, mass, or substance.
11.
Archaic. embodied.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English < Late Latin incorporātus past participle of incorporāre to embody, incarnate. See in-2, corporate
Related forms
incorporation, noun
incorporative, adjective
nonincorporative, adjective
Synonyms
4. embody, assimilate.

incorporate2

[in-kawr-per-it, -prit] /ɪnˈkɔr pər ɪt, -prɪt/
adjective, Archaic.
Origin
1525-35; < Late Latin incorporātus not embodied. See in-3, corporate
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for in-corporate

incorporate1

verb (ɪnˈkɔːpəˌreɪt)
1.
to include or be included as a part or member of a united whole
2.
to form or cause to form a united whole or mass; merge or blend
3.
to form (individuals, an unincorporated enterprise, etc) into a corporation or other organization with a separate legal identity from that of its owners or members
adjective (ɪnˈkɔːpərɪt; -prɪt)
4.
combined into a whole; incorporated
5.
formed into or constituted as a corporation
Derived Forms
incorporative, adjective
incorporation, noun
Word Origin
C14 (in the sense: put into the body of something else): from Late Latin incorporāre to embody, from Latin in-² + corpus body

incorporate2

/ɪnˈkɔːpərɪt; -prɪt/
adjective
1.
an archaic word for incorporeal
Word Origin
C16: from Late Latin incorporātus, from Latin in-1 + corporātus furnished with a body
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for in-corporate
incorporate
late 14c., "to put (something) into the body or substance of (something else)," from L.L. incorporatus, pp. of incorporare "unite into one body," from L. in- "into" + corpus (gen. corporis) "body" (see corporeal). The legal sense first recorded in Rolls of Parliament, 1461.
"Incorporation, n. The act of uniting several persons into one fiction called a corporation, in order that they may be no longer responsible for their actions. A, B and C are a corporation. A robs, B steals and C (it is necessary that there be one gentleman in the concern) cheats. It is a pundering, thieving, swindling corporation. But A, B and C, who have jointly determined and severally executed every crime of the corporation, are blameless." [Ambrose Bierce, 1885]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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