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in-depth

[in-depth] /ˈɪnˈdɛpθ/
adjective
1.
extensive, thorough, or profound:
an in-depth analysis of the problem.
2.
well-balanced or fully developed.
Origin
1960-1965
1960-65
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for in-depth
  • in-depth information and reporting on compensation of college presidents and other higher education leaders.
  • These employers have provided in-depth profiles full of information for prospective candidates.
  • Rich, in-depth coursework and discussions are now available to more students more often.
  • Some reporters and editors would argue that their book will provide them with a better, more in-depth sense of a topic.
  • And few programs in ecology and conservation offer any in-depth exposure to urban planning.
  • Others completed in-depth research projects or long articles headed for publication.
  • The objective is to give students an in-depth global educational and working experience.
  • Not everyone you meet will have in-depth knowledge of what you've studied.
  • During the next three weeks, each student chose one of four areas of focus for more in-depth study.
  • However, your writing sample should show in-depth and preferably current knowledge of some particular sub-field or debate.
British Dictionary definitions for in-depth

in-depth

adjective
1.
carefully worked out, detailed and thorough: an in-depth study
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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2
3
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