in-filtrate

infiltrate

[in-fil-treyt, in-fil-treyt]
verb (used with object), infiltrated, infiltrating.
1.
to filter into or through; permeate.
2.
to cause to pass in by filtering.
3.
to move into (an organization, country, territory, or the like) surreptitiously and gradually, especially with hostile intent: The troops infiltrated the enemy lines.
4.
to pass a small number of (soldiers, spies, or the like) into a territory or organization clandestinely and with hostile or subversive intent: The intelligence agency infiltrated three spies into the neighboring country.
verb (used without object), infiltrated, infiltrating.
5.
to pass into or through a substance, place, etc., by or as by filtering.
6.
Pathology. to penetrate tissue spaces or cells.
noun
7.
something that infiltrates.
8.
Pathology. any substance penetrating tissues or cells and forming a morbid accumulation.

Origin:
1750–60; in-2 + filtrate

infiltrative [in-fil-trey-tiv, in-fil-truh-] , adjective
infiltrator [in-fil-trey-ter, in-fil-trey-] , noun
reinfiltrate, verb, reinfiltrated, reinfiltrating.
uninfiltrated, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
infiltrate (ˈɪnfɪlˌtreɪt)
 
vb
1.  to undergo or cause to undergo the process in which a fluid passes into the pores or interstices of a solid; permeate
2.  military to pass undetected through (an enemy-held line or position)
3.  to gain or cause to gain entrance or access surreptitiously: they infiltrated the party structure
 
n
4.  something that infiltrates
5.  pathol any substance that passes into and accumulates within cells, tissues, or organs
6.  pathol a local anaesthetic solution injected into the tissues to cause local anaesthesia
 
[C18: from in-² + filtrate]
 
infil'tration
 
n
 
'infiltrative
 
adj
 
'infiltrator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

infiltrate
1758, of fluids, from in- "in" + filtrate. infiltration in figurative sense of "a passing into" (anything immaterial) is from 1840; Military sense of "stealthy penetration of enemy lines" dates from 1930.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

infiltrate in·fil·trate (ĭn-fĭl'trāt', ĭn'fĭl-)
v. in·fil·trat·ed, in·fil·trat·ing, in·fil·trates

  1. To cause a liquid to permeate a substance by passing through its interstices or pores.

  2. To permeate a porous substance with a liquid or gas.

n.
An abnormal substance that accumulates gradually in cells or body tissues.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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