inchoateness

inchoate

[in-koh-it, -eyt or, esp. British, in-koh-eyt]
adjective
1.
not yet completed or fully developed; rudimentary.
2.
just begun; incipient.
3.
not organized; lacking order: an inchoate mass of ideas on the subject.

Origin:
1525–35; < Latin inchoātus, variant of incohātus past participle of incohāre to begin, start work on, perhaps equivalent to in- -in-2 + coh(um) hollow of a yoke into which the pole is fitted + -ātus -ate1

inchoately, adverb
inchoateness, noun

inchoate, innate (see synonym study at innate).
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World English Dictionary
inchoate
 
adj
1.  just beginning; incipient
2.  undeveloped; immature; rudimentary
3.  (of a legal document, promissory note, etc) in an uncompleted state; not yet made specific or valid
 
vb
4.  to begin
 
[C16: from Latin incohāre to make a beginning, literally: to hitch up, from in-² + cohum yokestrap]
 
in'choately
 
adv
 
in'choateness
 
n
 
incho'ation
 
n
 
inchoative
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inchoate
1534, from L. inchoatus, pp. of inchoare, alteration of incohare "to begin," originally "to hitch up," from in- "on" + cohum "strap fastened to the oxen's yoke."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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