inconstant

[in-kon-stuhnt]
adjective
not constant; changeable; fickle; variable: an inconstant friend.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English inconstaunt < Latin inconstant- (stem of inconstāns) changeable. See in-3, constant

inconstancy, noun
inconstantly, adverb


moody, capricious, vacillating, wavering; undependable, unstable, unsettled, uncertain; mutable, mercurial, volatile. See fickle.


steady.
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World English Dictionary
inconstant (ɪnˈkɒnstənt)
 
adj
1.  not constant; variable
2.  fickle
 
in'constancy
 
n
 
in'constantly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inconstant
1402, "fickle, not steadfast," from M.Fr. inconstant, from L. inconstantem, from in- "not" + constantem (see constant).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

inconstant in·con·stant (ĭn-kŏn'stənt)
adj.

  1. Changing or varying, especially often and without discernible pattern or reason.

  2. Relating to a structure that normally may or may not be present.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
The constancy or inconstancy of employment cannot affect the ordinary profits of stock in any particular trade.
The inconstancy of the size at maturity estimates suggests that future re-characterizations are justified.
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