inculpate

[in-kuhl-peyt, in-kuhl-peyt]
verb (used with object), inculpated, inculpating.
1.
to charge with fault; blame; accuse.
2.
to involve in a charge; incriminate.

Origin:
1790–1800; < Late Latin inculpātus past participle of inculpāre to blame, equivalent to Latin in- in-2 + culp(a) fault + -ātus -ate1; cf. culpable

inculpation, noun
inculpatory [in-kuhl-puh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective

1. exculpate, exonerate, inculpate ; 2. exculpatory, inculpatory.


1, 2. exonerate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
inculpate (ˈɪnkʌlˌpeɪt, ɪnˈkʌlpeɪt)
 
vb
(tr) to incriminate; cause blame to be imputed to
 
[C18: from Late Latin inculpāre, from Latin culpāre to blame, from culpa fault, blame]
 
incul'pation
 
n
 
inculpative
 
adj
 
inculpatory
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inculpate
1799, "to accuse, bring charges against," from M.L. inculpatus, pp. of inculpare "to reproach, blame, censure," from L. in- "in" + culpare "to blame," from culpa "fault." But inculpable (1491) means "not culpable, free from blame," from L. in- "not" + culpare.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Murphy eventually made inculpatory statements, which were videotaped.
The investigator will seek all relevant information regarding the allegations, whether inculpatory or exculpatory.
Counsel argued that the statement was inculpatory as it demonstrated knowledge of the weapon.
During a police interrogation, he made a somewhat inculpatory statement.
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