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indole

[in-dohl] /ˈɪn doʊl/
noun, Chemistry
1.
a colorless to yellowish solid, C 8 H 7 N, having a low melting point and a fecal odor, found in the oil of jasmine and clove and as a putrefaction product from animals' intestines: used in perfumery and as a reagent.
Origin
1865-1870
1865-70; ind- + -ole2
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for indole's

indole

/ˈɪndəʊl/
noun
1.
a white or yellowish crystalline heterocyclic compound extracted from coal tar and used in perfumery, medicine, and as a flavouring agent; 1-benzopyrrole. Formula: C8H7N
Word Origin
C19: from ind(igo) + -ole1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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indole's in Medicine

indole in·dole (ĭn'dōl')
n.

  1. A white crystalline compound obtained from coal tar or various plants and found in the intestines and feces as a product of the bacterial decomposition of tryptophan. Also called ketole.

  2. Any of various derivatives of this compound.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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indole's in Science
indole
  (ĭn'dōl')   
  1. A white crystalline compound obtained from coal tar or various plants and produced by the bacterial decomposition of tryptophan in the intestine. It is used in the perfume industry and as a reagent. Chemical formula: C8H7N.

  2. Any of various derivatives of this compound.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for indole's

indole

a heterocyclic organic compound occurring in some flower oils, such as jasmine and orange blossom, in coal tar, and in fecal matter. It is used in perfumery and in making tryptophan, an essential amino acid, and indoleacetic acid (heteroauxin), a hormone that promotes the development of roots in plant cuttings

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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