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inflict

[in-flikt] /ɪnˈflɪkt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to impose as something that must be borne or suffered:
to inflict punishment.
2.
to impose (anything unwelcome):
The regime inflicted burdensome taxes on the people.
3.
to deal or deliver, as a blow.
Origin
1520-1530
1520-30; < Latin inflīctus past participle of inflīgere to strike or dash against, equivalent to in- in-2 + flīg- (stem of flīgere to beat down) + -tus past participle suffix
Related forms
inflictable, adjective
inflicter, inflictor, noun
inflictive, adjective
preinflict, verb (used with object)
uninflicted, adjective
Can be confused
afflict, infect, inflict.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for inflicting
  • We need to remember the horrors human beings are capable of inflicting upon one another.
  • War is about inflicting the maximum casualties on your opponents, if you want war that is how it should be.
  • They deserve to face severe consequences for what the harm they are inflicting.
  • There is a large store of wisdom decrying the human penchant for responding to pain by inflicting yet more of it.
  • But, the people inflicting discrimination on you and me don't care about the students or education.
  • Yet such parents seem oblivious to the damage they are inflicting.
  • The sacred lance instantly punished his frailty, spontaneously falling upon him, and inflicting a deep wound.
  • Fortune is not satisfied with inflicting one calamity.
  • Several brutal beatings have taken place with inflicting injury as the primary objective and robbing to be only secondary.
  • Both parties are capable of feeling and inflicting pain.
British Dictionary definitions for inflicting

inflict

/ɪnˈflɪkt/
verb (transitive)
1.
often foll by on or upon. to impose (something unwelcome, such as pain, oneself, etc)
2.
(rare) to cause to suffer; afflict (with)
3.
to deal out (blows, lashes, etc)
Derived Forms
inflictable, adjective
inflicter, inflictor, noun
infliction, noun
inflictive, adjective
Word Origin
C16: from Latin inflīgere to strike (something) against, dash against, from flīgere to strike
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inflicting

inflict

v.

1560s, from Latin inflictus, past participle of infligere "to strike or dash against," from in- "on, against" (see in- (2)) + fligere (past participle flictus) "to dash, strike" (see afflict). You inflict trouble on someone; you afflict someone with trouble. Shame on you.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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