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inflow

[in-floh] /ˈɪnˌfloʊ/
noun
1.
something that flows in; influx.
Origin
1645-1655
1645-55; in-1 + flow
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for inflow
  • Further, a poor investment climate hampers attracting outside investment slowing the inflow of foreign exchange.
  • So, the energy leakage into the smaller-scale continuum is precisely offset by the anergy inflow from the larger-scale continuum.
  • The sharks are especially at home in areas with lots of freshwater inflow, such as brackish river mouths.
  • Such an inflow would have lubricated the fault, making it more likely that the two sides would slip and slide.
  • Yet often evaporation exceeded inflow and the entire area was dry.
  • Fill with water then pump water center inflow to edge outflow.
  • On top of the inflow of foreign aid, this is helping to get the economy moving again.
  • The new paper provides some welcome clarity on the effectiveness of inflow controls.
  • They would be far worse but for this outflow of bodies and inflow of dollars.
  • Others blame it for an unwelcome inflow of cheap labour and an outflow of jobs.
British Dictionary definitions for inflow

inflow

/ˈɪnˌfləʊ/
noun
1.
something, such as a liquid or gas, that flows in
2.
the amount or rate of flowing in
3.
Also called inflowing. the act of flowing in; influx
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inflow
n.

1839, from in + flow (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for inflow

12
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