ingrate

[in-greyt]
noun
1.
an ungrateful person.
adjective
2.
Archaic. ungrateful.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English ingrat < Latin ingrātus ungrateful. See in-3, grateful

ingrately, adverb
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World English Dictionary
ingrate (ˈɪnɡreɪt, ɪnˈɡreɪt)
 
n
1.  an ungrateful person
 
adj
2.  ungrateful
 
[C14: from Latin ingrātus (adj), from in-1 + grātusgrateful]
 
'ingrately
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ingrate
1393, originally an adj. meaning "unfriendly," from L. ingratus "unpleasant, ungrateful," from in- "not" + gratus "pleasing, beloved, dear, agreeable" (see grace). The noun meaning "ungrateful person" dates from 1672.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Only an ingrate would question his casting decisions.
Diesel fuel was selected as the combustible material for the fires because of its relatively uniform burn-ingrate from containers.
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