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ingrown

[in-grohn] /ˈɪnˌgroʊn/
adjective
1.
having grown into the flesh:
an ingrown toenail.
2.
grown within or inward.
Origin of ingrown
1660-1670
1660-70; in-1 + grown
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for ingrown
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Excision of the cutting edge of the nail, as in radical operation of ingrown nail, eliminates only that element of discomfort.

  • They say that an ingrown nail is painful; an inpounded nail is worse.

    On a Donkey's Hurricane Deck R. Pitcher Woodward
  • It is partly temperament, partly the ingrown habit of the pleader.

  • It had been his custom to keep his dogs inside the house, and therefore they had a thick layer of ingrown dirt in their coats.

  • He not only puts a microscope to his eyes to know with, but his eyes have ingrown microscopes.

    The Lost Art of Reading Gerald Stanley Lee
  • He was a brooding, ingrown man, secretive and sullen, with a streak of wildness which he usually managed to control.

    The Man the Martians Made Frank Belknap Long
  • The man was small, ingrown and, as Brent Taber learned, somewhat stubborn.

    Ten From Infinity Paul W. Fairman
  • In my ingrown heart I hate him so there is no danger for me, tho' I've heard that he's a perfect fusser with the women.

British Dictionary definitions for ingrown

ingrown

/ˈɪnˌɡrəʊn; ɪnˈɡrəʊn/
adjective
1.
(esp of a toenail) grown abnormally into the flesh; covered by adjacent tissues
2.
grown within; native; innate
3.
excessively concerned with oneself, one's own particular group, etc
4.
ingrained
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ingrown
adj.

1660s, "native, innate," from in + grown. Of nails, "that has grown into the flesh," 1878.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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ingrown in Medicine

ingrown in·grown (ĭn'grōn')
adj.
Grown abnormally into the flesh.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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