inlaid

[in-leyd, in-leyd]

Origin:
1590–1600; past participle of inlay

uninlaid, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

inlay

[v. in-ley, in-ley; n. in-ley]
verb (used with object), inlaid, inlaying.
1.
to decorate (an object) with layers of fine materials set in its surface: to inlay a chest with lighter wood.
2.
to insert or apply (layers of fine materials) in the surface of an object: to inlay marble in a tabletop.
3.
Horticulture. to place (a fitted scion) into a prepared stock, as in a method of grafting.
noun
4.
inlaid work.
5.
a layer of fine material inserted in something else, especially for ornament.
6.
a design or decoration made by inlaying.
7.
Dentistry. a filling of metal, porcelain, or the like, that is first shaped to fit a cavity and then cemented into it.
8.
Horticulture, inlay graft.
9.
the act or process of inlaying.

Origin:
1590–1600; in-1 + lay1

inlayer, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
inlaid (ˈɪnˌleɪd, ɪnˈleɪd)
 
adj
1.  set in the surface, as a design in wood
2.  having such a design or inlay: an inlaid table

inlay
 
vb , -lays, -laying, -laid
1.  to decorate (an article, esp of furniture, or a surface) by inserting pieces of wood, ivory, etc, into prepared slots in the surface
 
n
2.  dentistry a filling, made of gold, porcelain, etc, inserted into a cavity and held in position by cement
3.  decoration made by inlaying
4.  an inlaid article, surface, etc
 
'inlaid
 
adj
 
'inlayer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inlaid
1598, from in + laid, pp. of lay. The verb inlay is recorded from 1596.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

inlay in·lay (ĭn'lā', ĭn-lā')
n.

  1. A solid filling, as of gold or porcelain, fitted to a cavity in a tooth and cemented into place.

  2. A graft of bone, skin, or other tissue.

  3. An orthomechanical device inserted into a shoe.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
The inlaid decorative woodwork of some of their harps has already turned them into museum pieces.
Take care to avoid snagging the raised edges sometimes found on veneered and inlaid surfaces.
The walls are inlaid with fishtanks stocked with exotic, brightly colored
  species from around the world.
There's a certain amount of whimsy at play here too: for instance, the brightly
  colored butterflies inlaid into the mosaic floors.
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