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insipience

[in-sip-ee-uh ns] /ɪnˈsɪp i əns/
noun, Archaic.
1.
lack of wisdom; foolishness.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin insipientia foolishness, equivalent to insipient- stem of insipiēns foolish (in- in-3 + -sipient-, combining form of sapient- sapient) + -ia; see -ence
Related forms
insipient, adjective
insipiently, adverb
Can be confused
incipient, insipid, insipient.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for insipient
  • It is not only the import tax that is affecting prices but also insipient local supply.
British Dictionary definitions for insipient

insipience

/ɪnˈsɪpɪəns/
noun
1.
(archaic) lack of wisdom
Derived Forms
insipient, adjective
insipiently, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Latin insipientia, from in-1 + sapientia wisdom; see sapient
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for insipient
adj.

"foolish," mid-15c., from Latin insipientem (nominative insipiens) "unwise, foolish," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + sapientem (see sapient). "Now mostly, or wholly, disused to avoid confusion with incipient" [OED].

insipience

n.

early 15c., "lack of wisdom, foolishness," from Old French insipience, from Latin insipientia "folly," from insipientem (see insipient).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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