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[in-spahyuh r] /ɪnˈspaɪər/
verb (used with object), inspired, inspiring.
to fill with an animating, quickening, or exalting influence:
His courage inspired his followers.
to produce or arouse (a feeling, thought, etc.):
to inspire confidence in others.
to fill or affect with a specified feeling, thought, etc.:
to inspire a person with distrust.
to influence or impel:
Competition inspired her to greater efforts.
to animate, as an influence, feeling, thought, or the like, does:
They were inspired by a belief in a better future.
to communicate or suggest by a divine or supernatural influence:
writings inspired by God.
to guide or control by divine influence.
to prompt or instigate (utterances, acts, etc.) by influence, without avowal of responsibility.
to give rise to, bring about, cause, etc.:
a philosophy that inspired a revolution.
to take (air, gases, etc.) into the lungs in breathing; inhale.
  1. to infuse (breath, life, etc.) by breathing (usually followed by into).
  2. to breathe into or upon.
verb (used without object), inspired, inspiring.
to give inspiration.
to inhale.
Origin of inspire
1300-50; Middle English inspiren < Latin inspīrāre to breathe upon or into, equivalent to in- in-2 + spīrāre to breathe
Related forms
[in-spahyuh r-uh-tiv, in-spi-rey-tiv] /ɪnˈspaɪər ə tɪv, ˈɪn spɪˌreɪ tɪv/ (Show IPA),
inspirer, noun
inspiringly, adverb
preinspire, verb (used with object), preinspired, preinspiring.
pseudoinspiring, adjective
reinspire, verb, reinspired, reinspiring.
uninspiring, adjective
uninspiringly, adverb Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for inspirer
Historical Examples
  • Thought and feeling joined in this conviction, each helping the other on, in interchanging rles of inspirer and inspired.

  • The book was a school of manners and of thought, an inspirer of heroic deeds.

  • He was not the inspirer of disturbances, nor the author of the Wars of the Roses.

  • Affection is the inspirer, intellect the up-and-doing agent of the soul.

    Cyropaedia Xenophon
  • He—the man—was the inspirer of that thing that to him seemed the most perfect of its kind.

    The Rescue Joseph Conrad
  • How could it have been otherwise, when her teacher and inspirer was love?

    Hidden Hand Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth
  • Who was the inspirer of it, and why should his death be designed, whilst his companion must be spared?

    A Mating in the Wilds Ottwell Binns
  • He has been an inspiration to France, the inspirer of the nations.

    American Sketches Charles Whibley
  • It was extraordinary that with such an appearance she should have been the inspirer of no romance, but so it was.

    Overlooked Maurice Baring
  • Truth is his inspirer, and earnestness the polisher of his sentences.

    A Plea for Captain John Brown Henry David Thoreau
British Dictionary definitions for inspirer


to exert a stimulating or beneficial effect upon (a person); animate or invigorate
(transitive; foll by with or to; may take an infinitive) to arouse (with a particular emotion or to a particular action); stir
(transitive) to prompt or instigate; give rise to: her beauty inspired his love
(transitive; often passive) to guide or arouse by divine influence or inspiration
to take or draw (air, gas, etc) into the lungs; inhale
(transitive) (archaic)
  1. to breathe into or upon
  2. to breathe life into
Derived Forms
inspirable, adjective
inspirative, adjective
inspirer, noun
inspiringly, adverb
Word Origin
C14 (in the sense: to breathe upon, blow into): from Latin inspīrāre, from spīrāre to breathe
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inspirer

c.1500, agent noun from inspire.



mid-14c., enspiren, "to fill (the mind, heart, etc., with grace, etc.);" also "to prompt or induce (someone to do something)," from Old French enspirer (13c.), from Latin inspirare "inflame; blow into" (see inspiration), a loan-translation of Greek pnein in the Bible. General sense of "influence or animate with an idea or purpose" is from late 14c. Also sometimes used in literal sense in Middle English Related: Inspired; inspires; inspiring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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inspirer in Medicine

inspire in·spire (ĭn-spīr')
v. in·spired, in·spir·ing, in·spires
To draw in breath; to inhale.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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