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7 Essential Words of Fall

instruct

[in-struhkt] /ɪnˈstrʌkt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to furnish with knowledge, especially by a systematic method; teach; train; educate.
2.
to furnish with orders or directions; direct; order; command:
The doctor instructed me to diet.
3.
to furnish with information; inform; apprise.
4.
Law. (of a judge) to guide (a jury) by outlining the legal principles involved in the case under consideration.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin instructus past participle of instruere to equip, train, set in order, equivalent to in- in-2 + struc- (variant stem of struere to put together) + -tus past participle suffix
Related forms
instructedly, adverb
instructedness, noun
instructible, adjective
misinstruct, verb (used with object)
overinstruct, verb (used with object)
preinstruct, verb (used with object)
quasi-instructed, adjective
reinstruct, verb (used with object)
self-instructed, adjective
self-instructing, adjective
uninstructible, adjective
uninstructing, adjective
well-instructed, adjective
Synonyms
1. tutor, coach; drill, discipline; indoctrinate; school. 2. prescribe. 3. enlighten.
Synonym Study
1. See teach.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for instruct
  • Imagine if you could instruct those services to interact with each other automatically under certain conditions.
  • Although emergency crews and police prefer and instruct that civilians stay away.
  • Second, the main job of any particular gene is to instruct cells to make its corresponding protein.
  • instruct them to reach consensus on the establishment of three groups of countries.
  • Please instruct me who to contact regarding this possible employment.
  • Then the treating doctor must instruct a laboratory to use the type of culture media on which the organisms grow.
  • Unfortunately for those of us who instruct in philosophy, there are other ways to become proficient in critical thinking.
  • Unless you instruct us otherwise, your cells will be destroyed at the conclusion of the project.
  • instruct students to read, review, and count pizzeria listings.
  • instruct students to write a descriptive paragraph about their kimono.
British Dictionary definitions for instruct

instruct

/ɪnˈstrʌkt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to direct to do something; order
2.
to teach (someone) how to do (something)
3.
to furnish with information; apprise
4.
(law, mainly Brit)
  1. (esp of a client to his solicitor or a solicitor to a barrister) to give relevant facts or information to
  2. to authorize (a barrister or solicitor) to conduct a case on a person's behalf: to instruct counsel
Derived Forms
instructible, adjective
Word Origin
C15: from Latin instruere to construct, set in order, equip, teach, from struere to build
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for instruct
v.

early 15c., from Latin instructus, past participle of instruere "arrange, inform, teach," literally "to build, erect," from in- "on" (see in- (2)) + struere "to pile, build" (see structure (n.)). Related: Instructed; instructing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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