intelligence

[in-tel-i-juhns]
noun
1.
capacity for learning, reasoning, understanding, and similar forms of mental activity; aptitude in grasping truths, relationships, facts, meanings, etc.
2.
manifestation of a high mental capacity: He writes with intelligence and wit.
3.
the faculty of understanding.
4.
knowledge of an event, circumstance, etc., received or imparted; news; information.
5.
the gathering or distribution of information, especially secret information.
6.
Government.
a.
information about an enemy or a potential enemy.
b.
the evaluated conclusions drawn from such information.
c.
an organization or agency engaged in gathering such information: military intelligence; naval intelligence.
7.
interchange of information: They have been maintaining intelligence with foreign agents for years.
8.
Christian Science. a fundamental attribute of God, or infinite Mind.
9.
(often initial capital letter) an intelligent being or spirit, especially an incorporeal one, as an angel.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin intelligentia. See intelligent, -ence

hyperintelligence, noun
nonintelligence, noun
preintelligence, noun
superintelligence, noun


1. See mind. 2. discernment, reason, acumen, aptitude, penetration.


2. stupidity.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
intelligence (ɪnˈtɛlɪdʒəns)
 
n
1.  the capacity for understanding; ability to perceive and comprehend meaning
2.  good mental capacity: a person of intelligence
3.  old-fashioned news; information
4.  military information about enemies, spies, etc
5.  a group or department that gathers or deals with such information
6.  (often capital) an intelligent being, esp one that is not embodied
7.  (modifier) of or relating to intelligence: an intelligence network
 
[C14: from Latin intellegentia, from intellegere to discern, comprehend, literally: choose between, from inter- + legere to choose]
 
intelli'gential
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

intelligence
late 14c., "faculty of understanding," from O.Fr. intelligence (12c.), from L. intelligentia "understanding," from intelligentem (nom. intelligens) "discerning," prp. of intelligere "to understand, comprehend," from inter- "between" + legere "choose, pick out, read" (see
lecture). Meaning superior understanding, sagacity" is from early 15c. Sense of "information, news" first recorded mid-15c., especially "secret information from spies" (1580s). Intelligence quotient first recorded 1922 (see I.Q.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

intelligence in·tel·li·gence (ĭn-těl'ə-jəns)
n.

  1. The capacity to acquire and apply knowledge, especially toward a purposeful goal.

  2. An individual's relative standing on two quantitative indices, namely measured intelligence, as expressed by an intelligence quotient, and effectiveness of adaptive behavior.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences for intelligences
Even the simplest organic or machine intelligences function poorly, if at all.
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