intelligent of

intelligent

[in-tel-i-juhnt]
adjective
1.
having good understanding or a high mental capacity; quick to comprehend, as persons or animals: an intelligent student.
2.
displaying or characterized by quickness of understanding, sound thought, or good judgment: an intelligent reply.
3.
having the faculty of reasoning and understanding; possessing intelligence: intelligent beings in outer space.
4.
Computers. pertaining to the ability to do data processing locally; smart: An intelligent terminal can edit input before transmission to a host computer. Compare dumb ( def 8 ).
5.
Archaic. having understanding or knowledge (usually followed by of ).

Origin:
1500–10; < Latin intelligent- (stem of intelligēns, present participle of intelligere, variant of intellegere to understand, literally, choose between), equivalent to intel- (variant of inter- inter-) + -lig- (combining form of leg-, stem of legere to pick up, choose; cf. lection) + -ent- -ent

intelligently, adverb
hyperintelligent, adjective
hyperintelligently, adverb
nonintelligent, adjective
nonintelligently, adverb
preintelligent, adjective
preintelligently, adverb
quasi-intelligent, adjective
quasi-intelligently, adverb
semi-intelligent, adjective
semi-intelligently, adverb
superintelligent, adjective

intelligent, intelligible, intellectual (see synonym study at the current entry).


1. bright. Intelligent, intellectual describe distinctive mental capacity. Intelligent often suggests a natural quickness of understanding: an intelligent reader. Intellectual implies not only having a high degree of understanding, but also a capacity and taste for the higher forms of knowledge: intellectual interests. 2. astute, clever, alert, bright, apt, discerning, shrewd, smart. See sharp.


1, 2. stupid.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
intelligent (ɪnˈtɛlɪdʒənt)
 
adj (foll by of)
1.  having or indicating intelligence
2.  having high intelligence; clever
3.  indicating high intelligence; perceptive: an intelligent guess
4.  guided by reason; rational
5.  (of computerized functions) able to modify action in the light of ongoing events
6.  archaic having knowledge or information: they were intelligent of his whereabouts
 
in'telligently
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

intelligent
c.1500, a back formation from intelligence or else from L. intelligens, prp. of intelligere (see intelligence).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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