interdictory

interdictory

[in-ter-dik-tuh-ree]
adjective
of, pertaining to, or noting interdiction.

Origin:
1745–55; < Late Latin interdictōrius. See interdict, -tory1

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interdict
 
n
1.  RC Church the exclusion of a person or all persons in a particular place from certain sacraments and other benefits, although not from communion
2.  civil law any order made by a court or official prohibiting an act
3.  Scots law an order having the effect of an injunction
4.  Roman history
 a.  an order of a praetor commanding or forbidding an act
 b.  the procedure by which this order was sought
 
vb
5.  to place under legal or ecclesiastical sanction; prohibit; forbid
6.  military to destroy (an enemy's lines of communication) by firepower
 
[C13: from Latin interdictum prohibition, from interdīcere to forbid, from inter- + dīcere to say]
 
inter'dictive
 
adj
 
inter'dictory
 
adj
 
inter'dictively
 
adv
 
inter'dictor
 
n

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