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interloper

[in-ter-loh-per] /ˈɪn tərˌloʊ pər/
noun
1.
a person who interferes or meddles in the affairs of others:
He was an athiest who felt like an interloper in this religious gathering.
2.
a person who intrudes into a region, field, or trade without a proper license.
Origin of interloper
1585-1595
1585-95;inter- + -loper (see landloper)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for interloper
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But the Count felt himself to be an interloper, and so insisted on shaking hands again and taking his departure.

  • He looks on the other man as an interloper, and his priest encourages that view.

    Ireland as It Is Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)
  • The capitalist is as unnecessary as any other kind of thief or interloper.

    British Socialism J. Ellis Barker
  • No sound was heard, and no demonstrations from the interloper were made.

  • Don't you regard me as an interloper now—one who has no right to speak because he does not belong to the Church?

British Dictionary definitions for interloper

interloper

/ˈɪntəˌləʊpə/
noun
1.
an intruder
2.
a person who introduces himself into professional or social circles where he does not belong
3.
a person who interferes in matters that are not his concern
4.
a person who trades unlawfully
Word Origin
C17: from inter- + loper, from Middle Dutch loopen to leap
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for interloper
n.

1590s, enterloper, "unauthorized trader trespassing on privileges of chartered companies," probably a hybrid from inter- "between" + -loper (from landloper "vagabond, adventurer," also, according to Johnson, "a term of reproach used by seamen of those who pass their lives on shore"); perhaps a dialectal form of leap, or from Middle Dutch loper "runner, rover," from lopen "to run." General sense of "self-interested intruder" is from 1630s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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