interrepulsion

repulsion

[ri-puhl-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of repulsing or the state of being repulsed.
2.
the feeling of being repelled, as by the thought or presence of something; distaste, repugnance, or aversion.
3.
Physics. the force that acts between bodies of like electric charge or magnetic polarity, tending to separate them.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Middle French < Medieval Latin repulsiōn- (stem of Late Latin repulsiō), equivalent to Latin repuls(us) (see repulse) + -iōn- -ion

interrepulsion, noun
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World English Dictionary
repulsion (rɪˈpʌlʃən)
 
n
1.  a feeling of disgust or aversion
2.  physics a force tending to separate two objects, such as the force between two like electric charges or magnetic poles

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

repulsion
1412, "repudiation," from L.L. repulsionem, noun of action from repellere (see repel). Meaning "action of forcing or driving back" is attested from 1547. Repulse (n. and v.) are attested from 1533, originally in Bellenden's Livy, from L. repulsus, pp. of repellere. Adj. repulsive
is attested from 1611, from Fr. repulsif (14c.), from M.L. repulsivus, from pp. stem of repellere. Originally it meant "able to repel;" the sense of "causing disgust" is first recorded 1816.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

repulsion re·pul·sion (rĭ-pŭl'shən)
n.

  1. The act of repelling or driving apart.

  2. A feeling of extreme dislike.

  3. The tendency of particles or bodies of the same electric charge or magnetic polarity to separate.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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