intersticed

interstice

[in-tur-stis]
noun, plural interstices [in-tur-stuh-seez, -stuh-siz] .
1.
an intervening space.
2.
a small or narrow space or interval between things or parts, especially when one of a series of alternating uniform spaces and parts: the interstices between the slats of a fence.
3.
Roman Catholic Church. the interval of time that must elapse, as required by canon law, before promotion to a higher degree of orders.
4.
an interval of time.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin interstitium, equivalent to interstit-, variant stem of intersistere to stand or put between + -ium -ium

intersticed, adjective
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World English Dictionary
interstice (ɪnˈtɜːstɪs)
 
n
1.  a minute opening or crevice between things
2.  physics the space between adjacent atoms in a crystal lattice
 
[C17: from Latin interstitium interval, from intersistere, from inter- + sistere to stand]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

interstice
c.1600, from L. interstitium "interval," lit. "space between," from inter- "between" + stem of stare "to stand" (see stet).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

interstice in·ter·stice (ĭn-tûr'stĭs)
n. pl. in·ter·stic·es (-stĭ-sēz', -sĭz)
A small area, space, or hole in the substance of an organ or tissue.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
interstice   (ĭn-tûr'stĭs)  Pronunciation Key 
An opening or space, especially a small or narrow one between mineral grains in a rock or within sediments or soil.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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