inulin

[in-yuh-lin]
noun Chemistry.
a polysaccharide, (C 6 H 10 O 5 ) n , obtained from the roots of certain plants, especially elecampane, dahlia, and Jerusalem artichoke, that undergoes hydrolysis to the dextrorotatory form of fructose: used chiefly as an ingredient in diabetic bread and as a reagent in diagnosing kidney function.
Also called alant starch.


Origin:
1805–15; < Neo-Latin Inul(a) a genus of plants (Latin: elecampane) + -in2

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World English Dictionary
inulin (ˈɪnjʊlɪn)
 
n
a fructose polysaccharide present in the tubers and rhizomes of some plants. Formula: (C6H10O5)n
 
[C19: from Latin inula elecampane + -in]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

inulin in·u·lin (ĭn'yə-lĭn)
n.
A fructose polysaccharide derived from the rhizomes of Inula helenium or I. elecampane, and other plants.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

inulin

polysaccharide that is a commercial source of the sugar fructose. It occurs in many plants of the family Asteraceae (Compositae), particularly in such roots and tubers as the dahlia and the Jerusalem artichoke. Inulin forms a white, crystalline powder that is as sweet as sucrose. The inulin molecule is a small, inert polysaccharide that readily passes through the digestive system and remains neutral to cellular activity. Because it is not absorbed by the body, it is used to sweeten foods consumed by diabetic patients.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences for inulin
Inulin is also gaining popularity as a source of soluble dietary fibre.
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