invective

[in-vek-tiv]
noun
1.
vehement or violent denunciation, censure, or reproach.
2.
a railing accusation; vituperation.
3.
an insulting or abusive word or expression.
adjective
4.
vituperative; denunciatory; censoriously abusive.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin invectīvus abusive, equivalent to Latin invect(us) (past participle of invehī to attack with words, inveigh) + -īvus -ive

invectively, adverb
invectiveness, noun
uninvective, adjective


1. contumely, scorn. See abuse.
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World English Dictionary
invective (ɪnˈvɛktɪv)
 
n
1.  vehement accusation or denunciation, esp of a bitterly abusive or sarcastic kind
 
adj
2.  characterized by or using abusive language, bitter sarcasm, etc
 
[C15: from Late Latin invectīvus reproachful, scolding, from Latin invectus carried in; see inveigh]
 
in'vectively
 
adv
 
in'vectiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

invective
1523, from a M.E. adj. (1430), "characterized by denunciatory language," from L.L. invectivus "abusive," from L. invectus, pp. of invehi "to attack with words" (see inveigh). For nuances of usage, see humor.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Scientists are no slouches when it comes to pitching invectives at colleagues.
He scrupulously forbore all invectives, detractions, and whatever might affect the reputation of any adversary.
The prelate found their invectives groundless, except that the want of a priest was a real defect in the community.
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