invisible

[in-viz-uh-buhl]
adjective
1.
not visible; not perceptible by the eye: invisible fluid.
2.
withdrawn from or out of sight; hidden: an invisible seam.
3.
not perceptible or discernible by the mind: invisible differences.
4.
not ordinarily found in financial statements or reflected in statistics or a listing: Goodwill is an invisible asset to a business.
5.
concealed from public knowledge.
noun
6.
an invisible thing or being.
7.
the invisible, the unseen or spiritual world.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Latin invīsibilis. See in-3, visible

invisibility, invisibleness, noun
invisibly, adverb
quasi-invisible, adjective
quasi-invisibly, adverb


2. veiled, obscure.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
invisible (ɪnˈvɪzəbəl)
 
adj
1.  not visible; not able to be perceived by the eye: invisible rays
2.  concealed from sight; hidden
3.  not easily seen or noticed: invisible mending
4.  kept hidden from public view; secret; clandestine
5.  economics of or relating to services rather than goods in relation to the invisible balance: invisible earnings
 
n
6.  economics an invisible item of trade; service
 
invisi'bility
 
n
 
in'visibleness
 
n
 
in'visibly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

invisible
1340, from O.Fr. invisible (13c.), from L. invisibilis "unseen, invisible," from in- "not" + visibilis (see visible).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

invisible

in economics, the exchange of physically intangible items between countries. Invisible trade can be distinguished from visible trade, which involves the export, import, and reexport of physically tangible goods. Basic categories of invisible trade include services (receipts and payments arising from activities such as customer service or shipping); income from foreign investment in the form of interest, profits, and dividends; private or government transfers of monies from one country to another; and intellectual property and patents. (See also intellectual-property law.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
More jarring still are the invisible inequalities, the ones hidden in
  statistics.
Once you do get tenure, and you're eminent and older, you'll stop being
  invisible.
It is moral hazard operating through the invisible hand.
Each blast normally sends out beams of invisible gamma rays and x-rays followed
  by an hours-long afterglow of visible light.
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