follow Dictionary.com

Stories We Like: Novels For Language Lovers

irate

[ahy-reyt, ahy-reyt] /aɪˈreɪt, ˈaɪ reɪt/
adjective
1.
angry; enraged:
an irate customer.
2.
arising from or characterized by anger:
an irate letter to the editor.
Origin
1830-1840
1830-40; < Latin īrātus past participle of īrāscī to be angry, get angry; see irascible, -ate1
Related forms
irately, adverb
irateness, noun
nonirate, adjective
nonirately, adverb
Synonyms
1. furious, irritated, provoked.
Antonyms
1. calm.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for irate
  • He is starting to get irate, but he is still smiling.
  • Two days later a card was handed in to the editor with a note asking him to see for a moment the husband of his irate caller.
  • Remove it from that place and you'll have both an irate lawn owner and a miserable lawn.
  • And-understandably-irate drivers are already complaining that it will take away their freedom on the road.
  • There was a ton of people who were really irate with the space shuttle, going back to its inception.
  • What's also apparent is that he was impatient, if not irate, over having been thwarted.
  • When forced to, drivers tend become panicked and/or irate.
  • The scene is replayed almost every night in the major leagues: an irate player venting over an umpire's call.
  • If they are unlucky, they hear the criticism second-hand, from their irate boss.
  • Elan, another pharmaceutical company, is now also facing irate investors and with more justification.
British Dictionary definitions for irate

irate

/aɪˈreɪt/
adjective
1.
incensed with anger; furious
2.
marked by extreme anger: an irate letter
Derived Forms
irately, adverb
Word Origin
C19: from Latin īrātus enraged, from īrascī to be angry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for irate
adj.

1838, from Latin iratus "angry, enraged, violent, furious," past participle of irasci "grow angry," from ira "anger" (see ire).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for irate

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for irate

5
5
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with irate

Nearby words for irate