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Drake

[dreyk] /dreɪk/
noun
1.
Sir Francis, c1540–96, English admiral and buccaneer: sailed around the world 1577–80.
2.
Joseph Rodman
[rod-muh n] /ˈrɒd mən/ (Show IPA),
1795–1820, U.S. poet.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for j r drake

drake1

/dreɪk/
noun
1.
the male of any duck
Word Origin
C13: perhaps from Low German; compare Middle Dutch andrake, Old High German antrahho

drake2

/dreɪk/
noun
1.
(angling) an artificial fly resembling a mayfly
2.
(history) a small cannon
3.
an obsolete word for dragon
Word Origin
Old English draca, ultimately from Latin dracōdragon

Drake

/dreɪk/
noun
1.
Sir Francis. ?1540–96, English navigator and buccaneer, the first Englishman to sail around the world (1577–80). He commanded a fleet against the Spanish Armada (1588) and contributed greatly to its defeat
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for j r drake

drake

n.

"male duck," c.1300, unrecorded in Old English but may have existed then, from West Germanic *drako (cf. Low German drake, second element of Old High German anutrehho, dialectal German Drache).

archaic for "dragon," from Old English draca "dragon, sea monster, huge serpent," from Proto-Germanic *drako (cf. Middle Dutch and Old Frisian drake, Dutch draak, Old High German trahho, German drache), an early borrowing from Latin draco (see dragon).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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