jacobinical

Jacobin

[jak-uh-bin]
noun
1.
(in the French Revolution) a member of a radical society or club of revolutionaries that promoted the Reign of Terror and other extreme measures, active chiefly from 1789 to 1794: so called from the Dominican convent in Paris, where they originally met.
2.
an extreme radical, especially in politics.
3.
a Dominican friar.
4.
(lowercase) one of a fancy breed of domestic pigeons having neck feathers that hang over the head like a hood.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English Jacobin < Old French (frere) jacobin < Medieval Latin (frater) Jacōbinus. See Jacob, -in1

Jacobinic, Jacobinical, adjective
Jacobinism, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
Jacobin (ˈdʒækəbɪn)
 
n
1.  a member of the most radical club founded during the French Revolution, which overthrew the Girondists in 1793 and, led by Robespierre, instituted the Reign of Terror
2.  a leftist or extreme political radical
3.  a French Dominican friar
4.  (sometimes not capital) a variety of fancy pigeon with a hood of feathers swept up over and around the head
 
adj
5.  of, characteristic of, or relating to the Jacobins or their policies
 
[C14: from Old French, from Medieval Latin Jacōbīnus, from Late Latin Jacōbus James; applied to the Dominicans, from the proximity of the church of St Jacques (St James) to their first convent in Paris; the political club originally met in the convent in 1789]
 
Jaco'binic
 
adj
 
Jaco'binical
 
adj
 
Jaco'binically
 
adv
 
'Jacobinism
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Jacobin
early 14c., of the order of Dominican friars whose order built its first convent near the church of Saint-Jacques in Paris. The Revolutionary extremists took up quarters there 1789. Used generically of radicals and reformers since 1793.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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