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jog1

[jog] /dʒɒg/
verb (used with object), jogged, jogging.
1.
to move or shake with a push or jerk:
The horseman jogged the reins lightly.
2.
to cause to function with a jolt for a moment or in a series of disconnected motions:
He jogged the motor and started the machine.
3.
to push slightly, as to arouse the attention; nudge:
She jogged his elbow when she wanted to be introduced to one of his friends.
4.
to stir or jolt into activity or alertness, as by a hint or reminder:
to jog a person's memory.
5.
to cause (a horse) to go at a steady trot.
6.
Printing. to align the edges of (a stack of sheets of paper of the same size) by gently tapping.
verb (used without object), jogged, jogging.
7.
to run at a leisurely, slow pace, especially as an outdoor exercise:
He jogs two miles every morning to keep in shape.
8.
to run or ride at a steady trot:
They jogged to the stable.
9.
to move with a jolt or jerk:
Her briefcase jogged against her leg as she walked.
10.
to go or travel with a jolting pace or motion:
The clumsy cart jogged down the bumpy road.
11.
to go in a desultory or humdrum fashion (usually followed by on or along):
He just jogged along, getting by however he could.
noun
12.
a shake; slight push; nudge.
13.
a steady trot, as of a horse.
14.
an act, instance, or period of jogging:
to go for a jog before breakfast.
15.
a jogging pace:
He approached us at a jog.
Origin
late Middle English
1540-1550
1540-50; blend of jot to jog (now dial.) and shog to shake, jog (late Middle English shoggen)
Related forms
jogger, noun

jog2

[jog] /dʒɒg/
noun
1.
an irregularity of line or surface; projection; notch.
2.
a bend or turn:
a country road full of sudden jogs.
3.
Theater. a narrow flat placed at right angles to another flat to make a corner, used especially in sets representing an interior.
verb (used without object), jogged, jogging.
4.
to bend or turn:
The road jogs to the right beyond those trees.
Origin
1705-15; variant of jag1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for jogging
  • By midmorning, she might take a jogging break with a neighbor.
  • The people who are in cities now deserve to have parks, bicycle lanes, jogging trails.
  • Recreation paths specifically built for roller blades, jogging, and biking.
  • He works, tends a small forest of potted plants, and spends hours a day jogging and doing breathing exercises.
  • And they have done it by jogging the memory of another bit of the body: the immune system.
  • As for the president himself, his jogging was mostly for show, and a hefty hamburger would often be consumed afterwards.
  • She now holds a part-time appointment, which she negotiated with her chairman when they went jogging together one day.
  • High-impact exercising, such as jogging or strenuous aerobics, can injure the feet and other parts of the leg.
  • Getting quizzed strengthens memory-jogging keyword clues.
  • It's true that train travel is one of the lowest impact ways to get from point to point short of walking, jogging or bicycling.
British Dictionary definitions for jogging

jogging

/ˈdʒɒɡɪŋ/
noun
1.
running at a slow regular pace usually over a long distance as part of an exercise routine

jog1

/dʒɒɡ/
verb jogs, jogging, jogged
1.
(intransitive) to run or move slowly or at a jog trot, esp for physical exercise
2.
(intransitive; foll by on or along) to continue in a plodding way
3.
(transitive) to jar or nudge slightly; shake lightly
4.
(transitive) to remind; stimulate: please jog my memory
5.
(transitive) (printing) to even up the edges of (a stack of paper); square up
noun
6.
the act of jogging
7.
a slight jar or nudge
8.
a jogging motion; trot
Word Origin
C14: probably variant of shog to shake, influenced by dialect jot to jolt

jog2

/dʒɒɡ/
noun (US & Canadian)
1.
a sharp protruding point in a surface; jag
2.
a sudden change in course or direction
Word Origin
C18: probably variant of jag1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for jogging
n.

1560s, verbal noun from jog (v.). In the running exercise sense, from 1948. As an adjective, by 1971.

jog

v.

1540s, "to shake up and down," perhaps altered from Middle English shoggen "to shake, jolt, move with a jerk" (late 14c.), of uncertain origin. Meanings "shake," "stir up by hint or push," and "walk or ride with a jolting pace" are from 16c. The main modern sense in reference to running as training mostly dates from 1948; at first a regimen for athletes, it became a popular fad c.1967. Perhaps this sense is extended from its use in horsemanship.

Jogging. The act of exercising, or working a horse to keep him in condition, or to prepare him for a race. There is no development in jogging, and it is wholly a preliminary exercise to bring the muscular organization to the point of sustained, determined action. [Samuel L. Boardman, "Handbook of the Turf," New York, 1910]
Related: Jogged; jogging. As a noun from 1610s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for jogging

jog

verb

To annoy; bother (1970s+ Teenagers)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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