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journey

[jur-nee] /ˈdʒɜr ni/
noun, plural journeys.
1.
a traveling from one place to another, usually taking a rather long time; trip:
a six-day journey across the desert.
2.
a distance, course, or area traveled or suitable for traveling:
a desert journey.
3.
a period of travel:
a week's journey.
4.
passage or progress from one stage to another:
the journey to success.
verb (used without object), journeyed, journeying.
5.
to make a journey; travel.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English journee day < Old French < Vulgar Latin *diurnāta a day's time, day's work, etc., equivalent to Latin diurn(us) daily + -āta, feminine of -ātus -ate1; see -ade1
Related forms
journeyer, noun
outjourney, verb (used with object), outjourneyed, outjourneying.
Synonyms
1. excursion, jaunt, tour. See trip1 . 5. roam, rove; peregrinate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for journeyer

journey

/ˈdʒɜːnɪ/
noun
1.
a travelling from one place to another; trip or voyage
2.
  1. the distance travelled in a journey
  2. the time taken to make a journey
verb
3.
(intransitive) to make a journey
Derived Forms
journeyer, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French journee a day, a day's travelling, from Latin diurnum day's portion; see diurnal
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for journeyer
journey
early 13c., "a defined course of traveling," from O.Fr. journée "day's work or travel," from V.L. diurnum "day," noun use of neut. of L. diurnus "of one day" (see diurnal). As recently as Johnson (1755) the primary sense was still "the travel of a day." The verb is from early 14c. Journeyman (early 15c.), "one who works by day," preserves the etymological sense. Its Amer.Eng. colloquial shortening jour (adj.) is attested from 1835.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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journeyer in the Bible

(1.) A day's journey in the East is from 16 to 20 miles (Num. 11:31). (2.) A Sabbath-day's journey is 2,000 paces or yards from the city walls (Acts 1:12). According to Jewish tradition, it was the distance one might travel without violating the law of Ex. 16:29. (See SABBATH.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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